E-Book/E-Text Announcements: October 2005 Archives

Science Fiction Classics

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Books hosted at durendal.org

Such as The Black Star Passes by J.W. Campbell, works of Andre Norton, Lester Del Rey, H. Beam Piper, and Murray Leinster.

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The Open Library

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The Open Library

Where e-book pages turn like real pages. A lovely concept, a future reality?

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Neat E-books

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Tennyson--Becket and Other Plays--I don't think I realized that Tennyson had a Becket.

The Spirit of St. Francis de Sales A lengthy anthology of the writings of the saint preceded by a short biographical sketch.

Slavery Ordained of God--a sad and sobering reminder of the extent to which religion can be perverted in the name of a cause.

Horace's Ars Poetica in English and Latin

The Greater Inclination--a lesser-known work of Edith Wharton. (Well, at least I've never heard of it, but then I'm not a Wharton Scholar.)

The Compleat Angler--The 18th Century Oddity of Izaak Walton.


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Starting with public domain works and gearing themselves up, one assumes.


The Poets and the Poetry of the Nineteenth... - Google Print

The Age of Shakespeare (1579-1631) - Google Print


The Age of Shakespeare (1579-1631) - Google Print

And THIS is the beta page from which you can begin your searches.

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Putting History on the Web

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Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web

A nice html source that gives suggestions and guidelines for putting historical material on the web.

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Of Interest to Home-Schoolers

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Project Gutenberg Titles by McGuffey, William Holmes, 1800-1873

The Gutenberg library of the Eclectic Primers Including readers, primers, and spelling-book. These often come with enthusiastic recommendations. I am a bit cautious. I wonder if they are lauded because they are good or because they are old. Older ways are not necessarily better ways. (Nor should one jump to the conclusion that they are necessarily worse ways either.)

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The Christ of Cynewulf

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The Christ of Cynewulf

Honestly, I don't know what to make of the offerings of cinmay.com. I can't enthusiastically endorse all of them, but some of them have a peculiar interest both antiquarian and oddity.

The Christ is an oddity in mediocre verse with some interesting wood-cuttings or engravings. Some of the poetry sings, some thuds, I won't comment on the theology because I haven't read extensively enough, but it parallels much of the site there is enough there to be wary of. Nevertheless, these things hold an odd charm.

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Moliere's Last Play

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Robert Browning: How to Know Him

A combination critical appreciation, biography and anthology of some of Brownings very best work. By far the most difficult of the Victorians, and likely one of the most difficult poets ever, Browning is a poet who has a surface smoothness that overlays enormous depths. He repays close reading many times over, and, at its best, his poetry is absolutely gorgeous.

One has only to glance at the printed page of _My Last Duchess_, and see how few of the lines end in punctuation points, to discover the method employed when a poet wishes to write a very strict measure in a very free manner.

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The California Missions

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A Biography of St. Augustine

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Anna's Story

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Guides On-Line

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Research Materials (By Era)

Among other things you'll find at this site at self-guided tours to a number of different battlefields. I note New Market, Second Manassas, Ball's Bluff, and Cedar Creek, in particular.

Not my cup of tea, but I suspect there are those who would appreciate these things. (Far more detail than any other than the die-hard fan can easily endure.)

Sample from second Manassas:

0300, King's Division may have withdrawn down Pageland Lane toward Manassas. And on the same day, between 0300 and 1000, Early's and Forno's Brigades of Lawton's Division moved into the fields northwest of the intersection about sunrise. The 13th and 31st Virginia were advanced as pickets just east of Stuart Hill on the other side of the nursery. Early was protecting Jackson's flank while looking for Longstreet. His men skirmished with the Pennsylvania Bucktails of Reynolds' Division.

During 1000 to 1200, Longstreet's Corps arrived from Thoroughfare Gap. He immediately placed Hood's Division in this area:
On approaching the field some of Brigadier General Hood's batteries were ordered into 9 position and his division was deployed on the right and left of the turnpike at right angles with it, and supported by . . . Evans' Brigade.
Reilly's Battery (Rowan Artillery) went into position on the ridge east of the nursery (Stuart Hill).

Wilcox's Division went into line on Hood's left (north).

Kemper's Division deployed south of Hood to the Manassas Gap Railroad Line.

D. R. Jones' Division moved down Pageland Lane to the south opposite Dawkin's Branch on the Manassas-Gainesville Road.

Then on 29 August at 1200 Lee established his headquarters on Stuart Hill (known as Munroe's Hill in 1862), just south of the turnpike.

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About this Archive

This page is a archive of entries in the E-Book/E-Text Announcements category from October 2005.

E-Book/E-Text Announcements: September 2005 is the previous archive.

E-Book/E-Text Announcements: November 2005 is the next archive.

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